Kinyras: The Divine Lyre

By: John C. Franklin, University of Vermont, AIAR Annual Professor

Kinyras is the legendary king of Cyprus, generally known only for his incestuous seduction by his daughter Myrrha (Ov. Met. 10.298–502). Yet a large body of scattered references—never completely assembled—ranges from Homer to Byzantine poets and scholars, and even the sixteenth-century Franco-Cypriot historian Étienne de Lusignan. Homer knew Kinyras as a Great King who treated with Agamemnon (Il. 11.19–23). The lost epic Cypria dealt with Kinyras’ faithless promise to join against Troy. Alcman’s ‘moist charm of Kinyras’ (3.71 PMGF) connects him with a Cypriot perfumed-oil industry going back to the Late Bronze Age. Pindar, invoking Kinyras as an exemplum for Hieron, has ‘Cypriot voices much resound around Kinyras’, makes him ‘cherished priest of Aphrodite’, and ‘golden-haired Apollo’s gladly-loved’ (Pyth. 2.15–17), and recalls an ancient Cypriot thalassocracy when he refers to the ‘blessed fortune . . . which once upon a time freighted Kinyras with riches in Cyprus on the sea’ (Nem. 8.17–18). All of these sources accord with Kinyras’ great proverbial wealth (Tyrtaeus 12.6 etc.). Continue reading

Ethics, Archaeology, and Open Access

By: Eric Kansa

The issue of open access to scholarly works recently gained renewed attention following the tragic suicide of Aaron Swartz, an Internet activist charged with felony computer and intellectual property crimes involving the mass download of articles from JSTOR. ASOR uses JSTOR as a repository for the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research (BASOR) and Near Eastern Archaeology (NEA)*.

Eric Kansa, a member of ASOR and the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) wrote the following opinion piece regarding the implications of Swartz’s death for scholarly communications in archaeology. The following reposts Eric’s discussion and a response from Fred Limp, President of the SAA. Both were originally posted here:
http://www.alexandriaarchive.org/blog/?p=891 and here: http://www.alexandriaarchive.org/blog/?p=899

Eric directs Open Context, an open data publication service for archaeology. He originally discussed open access issues in NEA (2007) with his colleagues Sarah Whitcher Kansa and Jason Schultz. He also co-edited (with Sarah Whitcher Kansa and Ethan Watrall) Archaeology 2.0, an open access book about new modes of scholarly communication published with the Cotsen Institute Press (UCLA). His most recent contributions exploring open access in archaeology are published in a special of World Archaeology (2012) edited by Mark Lake, and in the inaugural issue of the Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies (in press). Continue reading

Get access to the latest issue of Near Eastern Archaeology for free!

 

To access this issue go to our facebook page and like it if you haven’t already, then click the link near the top of the page to go to JSTOR. If you can’t find the link, look for the picture of Petra, the link is above it! The next page will ask you to set up a MyJSTOR account, once you’ve done so you’ll be able to read all the articles from the latest NEA, 75.2, for free!

If you already have a MyJSTOR account, sign in in a different tab in your internet browser, then click the link on our facebook page. That should give your account access to the issue.

https://www.facebook.com/ASOR.org 

NEA 75.2 (June 2012) Letter from the Editor -Issue Available Online on JSTOR

The latest issue of Near Eastern Archaeology is available now on JSTOR! Check it out here.

From the Editor

It gives me great pleasure, as the new Editor of Near Eastern Archaeology, to present the June issue of the journal. Publishing Near Eastern Archaeology continues to be both a challenge and an opportunity. The challenge is to present, in single issues of just 64 pages, snapshots of the different civilizations of this vast area through the several millennia of their history and of the diversity of modern scholarship. Is there anything like an “ancient Near East,” defined by similar ideas and embraced by a common past? How can we hope to understand those cultures in light of the fragmentary nature of the evidence and our different modern mentalities? How do we inform our readers in a meaningful and accessible way of the controversial debates and the often highly specialized scholarly methods and approaches? Continue reading

Free JSTOR Access and New NEA!

There’s a week left to access the full runs of all of ASOR’s three journals though JSTOR, so if you haven’t signed up, do it now! Click the button in our sidebar or click here to go to JSTOR and get free access to all our journals.

And now the latest issue of NEA is online as well. Sign up or sign in to check out NEA 75.1 before the print copies have even reached their destinations!

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ASOR Journals’ Current Content Now Available for Free on JSTOR!

The American Schools of Oriental research is excited to announce free access to the current content of all three of our publications during the month of April. You are now able to access all content published in Near Eastern Archaeology, Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research and the Journal of Cuneiform Studies over the last four years! Simply follow the instructions outlined below. If you decide to take advantage of this promotion we ask that you like us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/ASOR.org

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BASOR 363 (August 2011) available online for subscribers

ASOR is pleased to announce that BASOR 363 (August 2011) has been posted online at Atypon Link. This issue (and 4 years of back issues) is available to BASOR online subscribers and members who have chosen an online subscription as part of their membership.

You may access the table of contents for free here (members and subscribers will have complete access):

http://www.atypon-link.com/ASOR/toc/basor/363/august+2011

The issue contains articles by Sharon R. Steadman (“Take Me to Your Leader: The Power of Place in Prehistoric Anatolian Settlements”), Itzhaq Shai, Aren M. Maeir, David Ilan and Joe Uziel (“The Iron Age Remains at Tel Nagila”), and Eyal Regev “Royal Ideology in the Hasmonaean Palaces in Jericho”), and Benjamin Adam Saidel (“The Camera and the Pipe: Adjusting the Terminus Ante Quem of the Red-Slipped and Burnished Disc-Base Tobacco Pipes from Suba, Israel”).

The issue contains reviews by Edward B. Banning, Catherine Commenge, Louise Steel, Bill T. Arnold, and Pauline Albenda.

As a reminder, ASOR members who have chosen an online subscription receive the current year’s journals plus the last 4 years of ASOR journals as part of their subscription. For details on ASOR membership and how to get access to BASOR, JCS, and NEA, please see the following URL:

http://www.asor.org/updates/atypon-online.html

ASOR Newsletter 61.1 (Spring 2011) posted online

ASOR is pleased to announce that the ASOR Newsletter 61.1 (Spring 2011) has now been posted online at the ASOR home page (www.asor.org). We anticipate that the issue will be mailed within a week.

As a reminder, the ASOR Newsletter is available online for free at www.asor.org. In addition, ASOR journals are available via Atypon Link: the last 4+ years of ASOR journals are available to ASOR members who have chosen an online subscription on Atypon Link. For details on ASOR membership and how to get access to BASOR, JCS, and NEA, please see the following URL:

http://www.asor.org/updates/atypon-online.html

BASOR 362 (May 2011) available online for subscribers

ASOR is pleased to announce that BASOR 362 (May 2011) has been posted online at Atypon Link. This issue (and 4 years of back issues) is available to BASOR online subscribers and members who have chosen an online subscription as part of their membership.

You may access the table of contents for free here (members and subscribers will have complete access):

http://www.atypon-link.com/ASOR/toc/basor/362/may+2011

The issue contains articles by Elif Ãœnlü (“A Tale of Two Potting Traditions: Technological Assessment of the Light Clay and the Red Gritty Ware Types at Tarsus-Gözlükule [Cilicia-Turkey] at the Beginning of the Third Millennium B.C.”), Jacob Lauinger (“An Excavated Dossier of Cuneiform Tablets from Level VII Alalah?”), and Gwyn Davies “Under Siege: The Roman Field Works at Masada”).

The issue contains reviews by Jeffrey R. Zorn, Mark S. Smith, Assaf Yasur-Landau, John W. Betlyon, Peter Richardson, Sidnie White Crawford, Marica Cassis, Susan L. Cohen, Larry G. Herr.

As a reminder, ASOR members who have chosen an online subscription receive the current year’s journals plus the last 4 years of ASOR journals as part of their subscription. For details on ASOR membership and how to get access to BASOR, JCS, and NEA, please see the following URL:

http://www.asor.org/updates/atypon-online.html

JSTOR press release announces addition of ASOR to Current Scholarship Program

March 31, 2011 - JSTOR is pleased to announce the addition of 21 new journals from eight new publishers to the Current Scholarship Program, an effort launched earlier this year that brings together current and historical content on the JSTOR platform.

The University of Minnesota Press; the American Schools of Oriental Research; the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies; Science Fiction Studies; Paradigm Publishers; the American School of Classical Studies at Athens; Southeast Asia Program Publications at Cornell University; and the Modern Humanities Research Association have all recently joined the Current Scholarship Program, and their journals will be offered through the program for the 2012 subscription year.

With the addition of these publishers, the Current Scholarship Program now encompasses 196 titles from 27 publishers. The Program continues to expand its reach both internationally as well as in the range of publishers it serves, with the inclusion of its first commercial publisher (Paradigm Publishers) and its first UK-based participant (the Modern Humanities Research Association).

This second set of presses joins the esteemed journals and publishers already included in the Current Scholarship Program, including Chicago, California, Indiana, Illinois, Nebraska, and Penn State University Presses, and titles such as The American Historical Review, The Classical Journal, and The William and Mary Quarterly.

“The American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) and JSTOR are partnering to make scholarship readily available to researchers across the globe. The Current Scholarship Program increases the ease of online access to ASOR’s journals for our members and subscribers while maintaining high academic standards. ASOR is pleased to join the other distinguished publishers who are part of the JSTOR family, and we look forward to partnering with JSTOR for years to come” said Andrew G. Vaughn, Executive Director of ASOR.

“This newest group of publishers brings a number of important, high-quality publications to the program,” said Mary Rose Muccie, Director of the Current Journals Program at JSTOR. “They collectively share our vision to support the broad dissemination of scholarship through affordable and sustainable means, and their participation helps provide librarians with the ability to subscribe to and access an even greater amount of current content on JSTOR.”

Among the new titles added to the program is the internationally acclaimed The Black Scholar: Journal of Black Studies and Research; Slavic Review, a longstanding JSTOR participant; and Modern Language Review, one of the oldest and best-known modern language journals.  Electronic access to these 21 new titles will be available on JSTOR beginning in January 2012. For libraries that already participate in the JSTOR Archive Collections, participating in the Current Scholarship Program provides seamless access to the complete runs of journals via the JSTOR platform. Libraries may also subscribe to a complete run of single titles within the Program.

More information about the Current Scholarship Program can be found at the following URL:

http://about.jstor.org/participate-jstor/libraries/current-scholarship-program

NEA 73.2-3 (special issue on the archaeology of Lebanon) available online for subscribers

ASOR is pleased to announce that NEA 73.2-3 (June/September 2010) has now been posted online at Atypon Link. This double issue is 144 pages and focuses on the archaeology of Lebanon. This issue (and almost 4 years of back issues) is available to online subscribers of NEA and to ASOR members who have chosen an online subscription as part of their membership.

The issue contains articles by Jeanine Abdul Massih, Gassia Artin, Jean-Paul Thalmann, Hermann Genz, Claude Doumet-Serhal, Hélène Sader and Jens Kamlah, María Eugenia Aubet, Josette Elayi, Zeina Haddad, Ibrahim Noureddine, Suzy Hakimian, Leila Badre, Lina G. Tahan, and Neil Asher Silberman. There are also reviews by Sharon Zuckerman, Louise Steel, Kevin Butcher, and Benjamin W. Porter.

You may access the table of contents here:

http://www.atypon-link.com/ASOR/toc/nea/73/2-3

As a reminder, the last 4 years of ASOR journals are available to ASOR members on Atypon Link. For details, please see the following URL:

http://www.asor.org/updates/atypon-online.html

B. Sass posts reply to articles in NEA 72/4

Prof. Benjamin Sass, Tel Aviv University, has posted a reply to proposals made about Taita, King of Palistin in a recent issue of NEA (72/4).

Sass’ response is found online in the “Dig-it-al NEA” section of ASOR website. This online supplement to NEA is free:

http://www.asor.org/pubs/nea/dig-it-al-nea.html

You may access the table of contents of NEA 72.4 at Atypon Link here:

http://www.atypon-link.com/ASOR/toc/nea/2009/72/4

As a reminder, the last 3+ years of ASOR journals are available to ASOR members on Atypon Link. For details, please see the following URL:

http://www.asor.org/updates/atypon-online.html