Sunday , 15 December 2013

Rethinking the “Qumran Community”: Recent Approaches

Rethinking the “Qumran Community”: Recent Approaches

By: C.D. Elledge with Olivia Yeo Who really wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls? Twenty years ago, the available options for understanding the identity of the Dead Sea Scrolls Community we ...

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The Past Performative: Thinking through the Azraq Community Archaeology Project

The Past Performative: Thinking through the Azraq Community Archaeology Project

By: Alison Damick and Ahmad Lash All individuals belong to multiple fluctuating communities. How can archaeology help inform, and learn from, different communities? In this abridg ...

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Archaeology and the Bible – Yet Another Personal Viewpoint

Archaeology and the Bible – Yet Another Personal Viewpoint

By: Aren M. Maeir Biblical Archaeology, that so-popular yet so-vilified profession, deals with the interface between the archaeological remains and the cultures in which the bibli ...

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Saving Archaeological Heritage in Afghanistan

Saving Archaeological Heritage in Afghanistan

By: Hans Curvers Former coordinating archeologist at Mes Aynak  During a crisis or conflict, interventions first focus on emergency relief. Once the ‘post-conflict stage’ is reach ...

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Who Built the Water System at Gezer? A Preliminary Assessment of the Renewed Excavations

Who Built the Water System at Gezer? A Preliminary Assessment of the Renewed Excavations

By: Dan Warner In 1907, the Irish archaeologist Robert S. Macalister found an anomaly during his pioneering excavations at Gezer. He thought it was a reservoir but the feature tur ...

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New Explorations in the Heart of Assyria: Cities and Landscapes on the Erbil Plain, Kurdistan Region of Iraq

New Explorations in the Heart of Assyria: Cities and Landscapes on the Erbil Plain, Kurdistan Region of Iraq

By: Jason Ur After over 150 years of archaeological exploration, one might think that there are no great discoveries left to make in the Ancient Near East. All lost cities found, ...

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Common Ground: Archaeological Practice and Local Communities in Southeastern Turkey

Common Ground: Archaeological Practice and Local Communities in Southeastern Turkey

What is the proper relationship between archaeologist and a local community? Whose needs have priority? In this abridged piece from Near Eastern Archaeology, Melissa Rosenzweig an ...

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The Archaeology of Conflict and Remembrance at Gallipoli

The Archaeology of Conflict and Remembrance at Gallipoli

By: Sarah Midford and Jessie Birkett-Rees The First World War was an unprecedented catastrophe, killing millions and setting Europe on the path to further conflict. The eight mont ...

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Archaeology for the Masses: Tearing Down the Barriers between Archaeology and the Public

Archaeology for the Masses: Tearing Down the Barriers between Archaeology and the Public

By: Itzick Shai and Joe Uziel Who does archaeology belong to – the few or the many? Sitting in our archaeology labs we often find ourselves delving into small details uncovered in ...

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Why Zooarchaeology Should Not Be the Neglected Step-Child of Archaeology and Zoology

Why Zooarchaeology Should Not Be the Neglected Step-Child of Archaeology and Zoology

By: David R. Lipovitch Zooarchaeology, or animal bone archaeology, is a relatively new sub-field of archaeology. While some work was done as early as the 1870s in trying to unders ...

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Breaking Ground at Tel Abel Beth Maacah—Why Dig at the Gateway to the Arameans

Breaking Ground at Tel Abel Beth Maacah—Why Dig at the Gateway to the Arameans

By: Robert Mullins and Nava Panitz-Cohen Abel Beth Maacah is an imposing 35-acre mound controlling one of the most strategic passes in northern Israel and has the honor of being t ...

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Digging through Data at the Oriental Institute

Digging through Data at the Oriental Institute

By: Scott Branting, Jack Green, and Foy Scalf Think back to the time when you last visited a library and flicked through a card catalog to find a book. Card catalogs were made obs ...

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Hazor in the Ninth and Eighth Centuries BCE: From Omri to the Assyrian Destruction.

Hazor in the Ninth and Eighth Centuries BCE: From Omri to the Assyrian Destruction.

 ANE Today Editorial Introduction:* David and Solomon are controversial historical figures, but their successors, especially the Israelite dynasty of Omri, are not. Hazor was a th ...

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Tel Hazor Ninth and Eighth Centuries B.C.E. Photo Gallery

Tel Hazor Ninth and Eighth Centuries B.C.E. Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery:  Here's a gallery of all the images that appear in Near Eastern Archaeology 76.2 (2013) for Hazor in the ninth and eighth centuries B.C.E. Smaller versions of some ...

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200 Years of Tourism in the Holy Lands – From Mark Twain to the Digital Age

200 Years of Tourism in the Holy Lands – From Mark Twain to the Digital Age

By: Uzi Baram, Professor of Anthropology at the New College of Florida Heritage Tourism’s Roots in the Grand Tour Heritage contends with nature as the fastest growing parts of the ...

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Hogging the Attention: Cuisine and Culture in Ancient Israel

Hogging the Attention: Cuisine and Culture in Ancient Israel

By: Edward F. Maher The Iron Age of Ancient Israel (1200 – 586 BCE) includes the rise and decline of two well known cultural groups. The interactions between Israel and their neme ...

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The So-Called “Solomonic” City-gate at Megiddo

The So-Called “Solomonic” City-gate at Megiddo

Editor’s Note: The “Solomonic” gates at Hazor, Gezer and Megiddo have long been controversial for their apparent confirmation of Biblical accounts. Below, Prof. David Ussishkin, t ...

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Tel Hazor Iron I and Iron IIa Ages Photo Gallery

Tel Hazor Iron I and Iron IIa Ages Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery:  Here's a gallery of all the images that appear in Near Eastern Archaeology 76.2 (2013) for Hazor in the Iron I and Iron IIa Ages. Smaller versions of some of the i ...

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Hazor in the Tenth Century BCE

Hazor in the Tenth Century BCE

 ANE Today Editorial Introduction:* Few topics are more controversial than the biblical kingdoms of David and Solomon. Were they and their rulers real, and if so, what archaeologi ...

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Words in the Sand: Discovering A New Monumental Latin Inscription at ‘Ayn Gharandal (Ancient Arieldela), Jordan

Words in the Sand: Discovering A New Monumental Latin Inscription at ‘Ayn Gharandal (Ancient Arieldela), Jordan

By: Robert Darby & Erin Darby “The stone was huge, well over 500 pounds. It was quite a thing to witness. It was face down in the dirt, and using lots of muscle the workmen we ...

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