Sunday , 13 July 2014

World War I and Archaeology in Iraq

World War I and Archaeology in Iraq

By: Lamia Al Gailani Werr It is ironic that I am writing this article on the centenary of the First World War, while Iraq today is suffering from turbulence that is partly the con ...

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The Land Between The Two Rivers: Early Israelite Identities in Transjordan

The Land Between The Two Rivers: Early Israelite Identities in Transjordan

By: Thomas Petter, Associate Professor at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary Were there Israelites in Transjordan in the early Iron Age? How would we know from archaeology? Or if ...

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Cypriot Archaeology and the Great War

Cypriot Archaeology and the Great War

By: Thomas Davis, Professor of Archaeology, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary “Here’s another little baby Queen Victoria has got, Another little Colony, although she has g ...

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Tell Es-Sultan - A Pilot Project for Archaeology in Palestine

By: Lorenzo Nigro, University of Rome La Sapienza In a few weeks students and young scholars of Rome “La Sapienza” University, along with Palestinian colleagues from the Ministry ...

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Taking a Closer Look at the Past: the Microanalysis of Ceramic Artifacts in Archaeology Today

Taking a Closer Look at the Past: the Microanalysis of Ceramic Artifacts in Archaeology Today

By: Kamal Badreshany, CRANE Post-doctoral Fellow, Durham University When you walk across almost any Near Eastern tell pottery sherds are likely to crunch under your feet. The enor ...

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Back to Assyria: Cities, villages and canals in the Land behind Nineveh

By: Daniele Morandi Bonacossi   Decades of conflict culminated in the genocidal Anfal campaign waged against the Kurds in 1988 by Saddam Hussein’s regime. Now, the stabilization a ...

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How ASOR is Helping to Protect Egyptian Antiquities

How ASOR is Helping to Protect Egyptian Antiquities

By: Peter Herdrich EFFORTS TO SAVE EGYPTIAN ANTIQUITIES ARE PICKING UP SPEED. BUT WHOSE RESPONSIBILITY IS IT? The Washington Post recently published an opinion piece by Mohammed I ...

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Late Prehistoric Pastoral Exploitation of Arid Lands in Jordan: New Light from the Black Desert

By: Gary O. Rollefson Jordan’s Black Desert is a uniquely harsh and inhospitable place. It is a broad band of basalt that stretches across Jordan’s panhandle, running some 145 kil ...

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The Past Performative: Thinking through the Azraq Community Archaeology Project

The Past Performative: Thinking through the Azraq Community Archaeology Project

By: Alison Damick and Ahmad Lash All individuals belong to multiple fluctuating communities. How can archaeology help inform, and learn from, different communities? In this abridg ...

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Archaeology and the Bible – Yet Another Personal Viewpoint

Archaeology and the Bible – Yet Another Personal Viewpoint

By: Aren M. Maeir Biblical Archaeology, that so-popular yet so-vilified profession, deals with the interface between the archaeological remains and the cultures in which the bibli ...

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Saving Archaeological Heritage in Afghanistan

Saving Archaeological Heritage in Afghanistan

By: Hans Curvers Former coordinating archeologist at Mes Aynak  During a crisis or conflict, interventions first focus on emergency relief. Once the ‘post-conflict stage’ is reach ...

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Archaeology for the Masses: Tearing Down the Barriers between Archaeology and the Public

By: Itzick Shai and Joe Uziel Who does archaeology belong to – the few or the many? Sitting in our archaeology labs we often find ourselves delving into small details uncovered in ...

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Why Zooarchaeology Should Not Be the Neglected Step-Child of Archaeology and Zoology

By: David R. Lipovitch Zooarchaeology, or animal bone archaeology, is a relatively new sub-field of archaeology. While some work was done as early as the 1870s in trying to unders ...

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Who Really Built the Water System at Megiddo?

By: Norma Franklin Visitors to Megiddo thrill to the long descent into the famous water system, first climbing down the many steps that surround the gaping chasm dug deep into the ...

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Breaking Ground at Tel Abel Beth Maacah—Why Dig at the Gateway to the Arameans

By: Robert Mullins and Nava Panitz-Cohen Abel Beth Maacah is an imposing 35-acre mound controlling one of the most strategic passes in northern Israel and has the honor of being t ...

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Hazor in the Ninth and Eighth Centuries BCE: From Omri to the Assyrian Destruction.

 ANE Today Editorial Introduction:* David and Solomon are controversial historical figures, but their successors, especially the Israelite dynasty of Omri, are not. Hazor was a th ...

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200 Years of Tourism in the Holy Lands – From Mark Twain to the Digital Age

By: Uzi Baram, Professor of Anthropology at the New College of Florida Heritage Tourism’s Roots in the Grand Tour Heritage contends with nature as the fastest growing parts of the ...

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Hogging the Attention: Cuisine and Culture in Ancient Israel

By: Edward F. Maher The Iron Age of Ancient Israel (1200 – 586 BCE) includes the rise and decline of two well known cultural groups. The interactions between Israel and their neme ...

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The So-Called “Solomonic” City-gate at Megiddo

Editor’s Note: The “Solomonic” gates at Hazor, Gezer and Megiddo have long been controversial for their apparent confirmation of Biblical accounts. Below, Prof. David Ussishkin, t ...

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Tel Hazor Iron I and Iron IIa Ages Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery:  Here's a gallery of all the images that appear in Near Eastern Archaeology 76.2 (2013) for Hazor in the Iron I and Iron IIa Ages. Smaller versions of some of the i ...

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