Screen Shot 2015-01-12 at 8.20.46 AM

Transcendent Occultation of the Divine in Neo-Babylonian Art [VIDEO]

At the 2014 ASOR Annual Meeting in San Diego, Constance Gane chaired the Archaeology of Mesopotamia session. This session had submissions in all areas illuminated by archaeology that relate to the material […]

CONTINUE READING
BASOR Podcast

FOA Podcast, “A Look Inside BASOR,” Featuring Professors Rollston and Cline

In this episode of the Friends of ASOR podcast, we go behind the scenes for an inside look at the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research (BASOR). We’re talking with […]

CONTINUE READING
MarcMarin

Filling in the Gaps: New Technologies for Archaeological Reconstructions

At the 2014 ASOR Annual Meeting, Pedro Azara and his team presented the paper, “Filling in the Gaps: New Technologies for Archaeological Reconstructions […]

CONTINUE READING
Baal cycle tablet, Louvre Museum

The Current State of Ugaritic Studies

No other language and culture of Northwest Semitic – the family of languages and cultures used in the Levant including Hebrew, Phoenician and Aramaic – prior to the appearance of the Hebrew Bible has offered a similar corpus of linguistic […]

CONTINUE READING
Tzvi-Abusch

Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-Witchcraft Rituals

During my stay, I continued to work on the preparation of critical editions and studies of Mesopotamian Anti-Witchcraft Rituals. But I should preface my report on this work […]

CONTINUE READING
“Une figurine d’envoûtement paléo-babylonienne,” Beiträge zur Altorientalischen Archäologie und Altertumskunde. Festschrift für Barthel Hrouda zum 65. Geburtstag, ed. P. Calmeyer et al., Harrassowitz: Wiesbaden 1994, 97–101, XIII.

Witchcraft in Ancient Mesopotamia

Belief in witches was as widespread in Mesopotamia as it was in Europe. Incantation and ritual texts preserved on cuneiform tablets provide a vivid image of witchcraft in 2nd and 1st millennium Mesopotamia. But a closer look reveals fundamental […]

CONTINUE READING
Map of Assyrian Empire.

When were the Israelites? Understanding Israelite Identity in the Pre-Exilic Period

Scholars have long asked, “Who were the Israelites?” Less frequent is the question, “When were the Israelites?”

CONTINUE READING
ASORPodcasts copy

“Gilgamesh: Civilization vs. Natural World,” Featuring J.J.M. Roberts

In this episode, ASOR’s own Ancient Near East Today editor, Alex Joffe spoke with Jimmy Jack McBee Roberts (J. J. M. Roberts) the William Henry Green Professor of Old Testament Literature (Emeritus) at Princeton Theological Seminary.

CONTINUE READING
asor4

Cities of Desire

By: Ömür Harmanşah Cities Between Imagination and Political Desire In his Invisible Cities, the Italian writer Italo Calvino wrote that “cities, like dreams, are made of desires and fears, even if the thread of their discourse is secret, their rules are absurd, their perspectives deceitful, and everything conceals something else.” Study of ancient cities has […]

CONTINUE READING
ASORPodcasts copy

“The Tablet That’s Changing an Old Story,” featuring Professor Alan Millard

In this episode, ASOR’s own Ancient Near East Today editor, Alex Joffe talks with professor and author Alan Millard. The podcast focuses on a newly published tablet that is shedding new light on the Epic of Gilgamesh. The epic follows the perilous journeys of the king

CONTINUE READING
ASORPodcasts copy

“A New Look at an Old Story: the Epic of Gilgamesh,” featuring Dr. Lawson Younger

In this episode ASOR’s own Ancient Near East Today editor, Alex Joffe talks with Dr. Lawson Younger. Dr. Younger is a professor of Old Testament, Semitic Languages, and Ancient Near Eastern History at the Trinity Evangelical Divinity School.

CONTINUE READING

Ask an Archaeologist: Adam Aja - Harvard Semitic Museum

While at the Semitic Museum at Harvard, Ask an Archaeologist also spoke to Dr. Adam Aja, the Assistant Curator of Collections at the Museum and Assistant Director of Harvard’s expedition at Ashkelon in Israel. [See our interviews with Dr. Joe Greene and Dr. Stephen Bourke] We asked Dr. Aja questions we received from children attending Archaeology […]

CONTINUE READING
Laura Mazow

“A Bathtub Murder”: (Re)Investigating Mesopotamian Bathtub Coffins

By: Laura B. Mazow, East Carolina University National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research Bath-shaped basins dated to the Bronze and Iron Ages, discovered in both burial and habitation contexts, have been interpreted as either burial coffins or bathing tubs that reflect immigration or elite emulation of foreign traditions. I […]

CONTINUE READING
Sign in to view all ASOR Blog content!
If you have not set up a username and password for the ASOR Blog, please close this box by clicking anywhere on the screen then go to the Friends of ASOR option in the menu above. If you have forgotten your password, please click the Forgot Login Password option in the above menu.