You are currently browsing the archives for May, 2012

Archaeology Weekly Roundup

§ May 25th, 2012 § Filed under Archaeology in the News, ASOR § Tagged archaeology in the news § No Comments

Researchers from Tel Aviv University have recently discovered a collection of gold and silver jewelry, dated from around 1100 B.C., hidden in a vessel at the archaeological site of Tel Megiddo in the Jezreel Valley in northern Israel. One piece — a gold earring decorated with molded ibexes, or wild goats — is “without parallel,” they believe.

The Egyptian papyrus Cairo 86637 calendar is probably the oldest preserved historical document of bare eye observations of a variable star, the “Demon star”, Algol, which seems to have influenced their predictions of good days.

§ Read the rest of this entry…

ASOR’s Social Media Survey

§ May 22nd, 2012 § Filed under ASOR § Tagged ASOR § No Comments

Take our social media survey and let us know what you think about our blog, facebook page, and website!

Click here to take the survey.

 

Archaeology Weekly Roundup

§ May 18th, 2012 § Filed under Archaeology in the News § Tagged archaeology in the news § No Comments

Archaeologists have discovered evidence for a previously unknown ancient language on cuneiform tablets buried in the ruins of a 2800 year old Middle Eastern palace.

An Italian court has upheld an order for the seizure of a masterpiece of the J. Paul Getty Museum’s antiquities collection, finding that the bronze statue of a victorious athlete was illegally exported from Italy before the museum purchased it for $4 million in 1976.

§ Read the rest of this entry…

The Qeiyafa Ostracon Again: A Sober Assessment in Light of the New Finds

§ May 14th, 2012 § Filed under Archaeology in the News, Epigraphy § Tagged archaeology in the news, Christopher Rollston, epigraphy § 13 Comments

By Christopher A. Rollston
Toyozo Nakarai Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages, Emmanuel Christian Seminary

For those working in the field(s) of ancient history, ancient literature, archaeology, or epigraphy there often seems to be a strong desire to associate some new archaeological find, or some recent epigraphic discovery, with some person or event known from literary texts discussing the days of yore.  This basic phenomenon has a long history with regard to literary texts.  For example, within the Hebrew Bible, the book of Lamentations is anonymous, but through the centuries many contended that it was written by the Prophet Jeremiah.  Similarly, the book of Ruth is anonymous, but through the centuries many argued that it was written by Samuel.  Or again, within the Greek New Testament, the book of Hebrews is anonymous, but many attempted to argue that it was written by Paul.  Similarly, the four Canonical Gospels are anonymous, but through the centuries, many have argued that these books were written by known figures of Early Christianity.  Fortunately, critical scholarship has pushed back against such positivistic assumptions and reasserted the obvious: the evidence for these assumptions is not convincing, but specious.

§ Read the rest of this entry…

Archaeology Weekly Roundup!

§ May 11th, 2012 § Filed under Archaeology in the News, ASOR § Tagged archaeology in the news § No Comments

BU’s Professor Saturno has announced spectacular new finds from the Maya site of Xultun, including the oldest-known Mayan astronomical tables,  pre-dating other Mayan calendars by centuries. Click here to see high res pictures of one of the murals.

Hebrew University archaeologist finds the first evidence of a cult in Judah at the time of King David. ASOR member, Prof. Yosef Garfinkel, announced the discovery of objects from the archaeological excavations at Khirbet Qeiyafa, that for the first time shed light on how a cult was organized in Judah at the time of King David.

§ Read the rest of this entry…

Secondary Context II announcement

§ May 7th, 2012 § Filed under Annual Meeting § Tagged annual meeting § No Comments

Site ravaged by looting, SE corner of the enclosing walls of the inner city, Al Resafa, Syria. Image, courtesy of the photographer, Thomas Schutyser

ASOR WORKSHOP
ANNUAL MEETING 2012 (Chicago)
SECONDARY CONTEXT II
Considering Theory and Method for The Study of Objects of No Known Origin

Having examined the complex issues involved in research ethics and the study of unprovenienced material in 2011, we focus on Theory and Method in 2012.

Rather than asking “Should we?” or “Shouldn’t we?” study, present, publish, or exhibit objects of unknown origin, we look forward to considering how best to determine guidelines or suggested practices in an arena where opinions are admittedly complex and often contested.

In 2012, our presenters address the conscientious treatment of unprovenienced artifacts, corpora and collections. New, responsible ways to exhibit and/or publish such works are also considered.

§ Read the rest of this entry…

Archaeology Weekly Roundup!

§ May 4th, 2012 § Filed under Archaeology in the News, ASOR § Tagged archaeology in the news § No Comments

A great new tool, ORBIS expresses Roman communication costs in terms of both time and expense. By simulating movement along the principal routes of the Roman road network, the main navigable rivers, and hundreds of sea routes in the Mediterranean, Black Sea and coastal Atlantic, this interactive model reconstructs the duration and financial cost of travel in antiquity.

§ Read the rest of this entry…

Christina Luke on Building Understanding and Countering the Illegal Trade in Antiquities

§ May 3rd, 2012 § Filed under Antiquities Market, Cultural Property and Heritage § Tagged annual meeting, Antiquities market and looting, cultural heritage and patrimony § No Comments

One of the highlights of the ASOR Workshop, SECONDARY CONTEXT I, was a contribution by Christina Luke, the noted researcher and scholar of legislation pertaining to the regulation of the movement of unprovenienced artifacts.
§ Read the rest of this entry…

Changing attitudes toward looting. What are your ideas?

§ May 1st, 2012 § Filed under Antiquities Market, ASOR, Cultural Property and Heritage § Tagged Antiquities market and looting, cultural heritage and patrimony, israel § 9 Comments

Euphronios Krater, returned to Italy by the Metropolitan Museum of Art

By Dr. Lynn Swartz Dodd

A growing body of literature documents the reality that the ancient, buried landscape of Israel, including the areas known as the West Bank and Gaza, are being inexorably and irretrievably looted. Looting refers to a process by which objects are removed without official permission or archaeological oversight and documentation. [1] Some positive outcomes may devolve to those who participate in such activities (money from selling artifacts, cultivation of buyer/dealer networks, prestige from owning objects that are old and in increasingly short supply).  In every single case, there is a parallel negative result that occurs, which is the loss of context for an ancient object and the loss of association between those certain artifacts and the place they last were laid by an ancient actor. Anyone who denies that this outcome is the reality is, in this author’s mind, uninformed about the consequences of looting. § Read the rest of this entry…