ASOR Newsletter 59.4/60.1 has been mailed

ASOR is pleased to announce that ASOR Newsletter 59.4/60.1 (Winter 2009/Spring 2010) has now been mailed and posted online at the ASOR home page (www.asor.org).

As a reminder, the ASOR Newsletter is available online for free at www.asor.org. In addition, ASOR journals are available via Atypon Link: the last 3+ years of ASOR journals are available to ASOR members who have chosen an online subscription on Atypon Link. For details on ASOR membership and how to get access to BASOR, JCS, and NEA, please see the following URL:

http://www.asor.org/updates/atypon-online.html

back issues of JCS available to ASOR members at steep discounts

JCS (Journal of Cuneiform Studies) back issues available to current ASOR members at steep discounts

Details: From now until September 15, 2010, purchase as many volumes as you wish from the list of discounted prices below (subject to availability) plus shipping (see below). Please send a list of your needs to asorpubs@bu.edu (or call 617-358-4376), and we will send you a quote based on availability and shipping.

  • vol. 41/1 (1989): $3
  • vol. 41/2 (1989): $3
  • vol. 42/1 (1990): $3
  • vol. 43-35 (1991-1993): $10
  • vol. 46 (1994): $5
  • vol. 47 (1995): $5
  • vol. 50 (1998): $5
  • vol. 57 (2005): $5
  • vol. 58 (2006): $5
  • vol. 60 (2008): $5
  • vol. 61 (2009): $40
  • vol. 62 (2010): $50

Shipping rates:

  • US shipping rates: $5 for first volume; $1 each additional volume
  • Canadian shipping rates: $6 for first volume; $4 each additional volume
  • Other non-US shipping rates: $10 first volume; $5 each additional volume

Note: You must be a current ASOR member (professional, retired, or student) to receive these discounted prices. Offer expires on September 15, 2010.

B. Sass posts reply to articles in NEA 72/4

Prof. Benjamin Sass, Tel Aviv University, has posted a reply to proposals made about Taita, King of Palistin in a recent issue of NEA (72/4).

Sass’ response is found online in the “Dig-it-al NEA” section of ASOR website. This online supplement to NEA is free:

http://www.asor.org/pubs/nea/dig-it-al-nea.html

You may access the table of contents of NEA 72.4 at Atypon Link here:

http://www.atypon-link.com/ASOR/toc/nea/2009/72/4

As a reminder, the last 3+ years of ASOR journals are available to ASOR members on Atypon Link. For details, please see the following URL:

http://www.asor.org/updates/atypon-online.html

JCS 62 (2010) now available online

JCS (Journal of Cuneiform Studies) 62 (2010)

ASOR is pleased to announce that JCS 62 (2010) has now been posted online at Atypon Link.

You may access the table of contents here:

http://www.atypon-link.com/ASOR/toc/jocs/62/2010

The issue contains articles by Massimo Maiocchi, Sarood T. Mohammed Taher, Gonzalo Rubio, Thomas E. Balke, Paul Delnero, Cécile Michel, Jan Tavernier, John P. Nielsen, Alice Mouton, Jeanette C. Fincke. JCS is edited by Piotr Michalowski, and the managing editor is Billie Jean Collins.

As a reminder, the last 3-4 years of ASOR journals (BASOR, JCS, and NEA) are available to ASOR members on Atypon Link. The last 4 years of JCS (2007-2010) are available with an online subscription or with an ASOR membership. For details, please see the following URL:

http://www.asor.org/updates/atypon-online.html

Update on ASOR’s strategic plan

Strategic plan adopted by ASOR board.

It is with great pleasure we announce that on April 24, 2010, the ASOR board of trustees unanimously adopted the “Strategic Plan as a blueprint to move ASOR forward.” A considerable amount of work has been done by the Strategic Planning Task Force that was chaired by ASOR President Tim Harrison. We thank President Harrison and the rest of the committee (Susan Ackerman, Jimmy Hardin, Morag Kersel, Sten LaBianca, P. E. MacAllister, and Carol Meyers) for their efforts and excellent work. To review ASOR’s Strategic Planning documents, please click here.

The Strategic Plan sets forth a blueprint for ASOR to move forward, but it intentionally did not resolve many implementation issues. The next step will be for President Tim Harrison to appoint an “Implementation Task Force” that will be charged with bringing specific recommendations for implementing the goals set forth in the Strategic Plan to the board of trustees. Updates on the progress of this committee will be posted online and in upcoming ASOR Newsletters.

Please contact Tim Harrison with any questions or comments on the Strategic Plan and with recommendations for the implementation stage. This is an exciting time for ASOR and we look forward to collaborating with our members in the years to come.

Posted by ASOR’s executive director: Andrew G. Vaughn

ASOR job opening

We are pleased to announce that ASOR has an opening for a director of subscriptions, memberships, and publications services. This is a vital position for ASOR, and we ask your help in soliciting applications and nominations.

Please see the URL below for details about this position:
http://www.asor.org/updates/job-opening-announce.html

NEA 73.1 available online via Atypon Link

Near Eastern Archaeology 73.1

ASOR is pleased to announce that NEA 73.1 (March 2010) has now been posted online at Atypon Link.

The issue contains a feature article by A. Burke and K. Lords as well as articles S. Savage, A. Al-Shorman, C. Luckey, and K. Rask.

You may access the table of contents here:

http://www.atypon-link.com/ASOR/toc/nea/73/1

As a reminder, the last 3+ years of ASOR journals are available to ASOR members on Atypon Link. For details, please see the following URL:

http://www.asor.org/updates/atypon-online.html

BASOR 357 (Feb 2010) available online

BASOR 357 (Feb 2010)

ASOR is pleased to announce that BASOR 357 (February 2010) has now been posted online at Atypon Link.

You may access the table of contents here:

http://www.atypon-link.com/ASOR/toc/basor/357/february+2010

The issue contains articles by Maysoon al-Nahar, Christopher M. Monroe, Gideon Avni, and Asa Eger.

As a reminder, the last 3+ years of ASOR journals are available to ASOR members on Atypon Link. For details, please see the following URL:

http://www.asor.org/updates/atypon-online.html

Things to Do in New Orleans With Children

When my family and I moved to New Orleans about a decade ago, we were pleasantly surprised to find so many great activities for children. Here are some activities that my wife and I would recommend:

  1. The Audubon Zoo makes for a nice day. You can get there via the St Charles streetcar, or a taxi. They even have a great archaeology section in the South America exhibit where your children can excavate ruins in the sand. Nearby Audubon Park has nice playground equipment, and Tulane and Loyola Universities are nearby as well (6500 Magazine Street, 504-581-4629).
  2. The Audubon Aquarium is also fun and within easy walking distance from our hotel. Though I’ve never been, I’ve heard mixed reviews about the newly opened Insectarium. The Aquarium has an imax theater, but the best bet would be the penguins. Therese says “the aquarium has eye candy for young and old alike, and it is stroller friendly” (Canal Street at the River, 504-581-4629).
  3. The Louisiana Children’s Museum is also within walking distance and is fun for younger children. Therese says it’s pretty much like every other children’s museum though. It’s a good option if it’s raining (420 Julia Street, 504-523-1357).
  4. If you take the Canal Street Streetcar (City Park Line) you can visit the New Orleans Museum of Art and the Sculpture Garden. Plus, there are paddle boat rides where you can chase geese and great walking trails in City Park. There are some great playgrounds also for younger children.
  5. Cafe du Monde is a must stop for beignets and cafe au lait (1039 Decatur Street, 504-525-4544). Nearby you can watch boats on the river, and see street performers around Jackson Square. Get a muffaletta from Central Grocery (923 Decatur St, 504-523-1620) or even better, the Italian grocery next door, and bring it back to Jackson Square for a picnic.
  6. We’ve found that cemeteries are interesting to the old and young alike. St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 is on the N. side of Basin Street, and within walking distance of the hotel. Be sure to visit the grave of Marie Lavau, the voodoo queen. Check with Save Our Cemeteries for organized tours and visit their visitor’s center (501 Basin Street, 504-525-3377).
  7. There are free boat rides on the Mississippi River with the Canal Street Ferry. The round-trip ferry ride across the Mighty Mississipp is a pretty exciting adventure the first 100 or so times, and feeling the power of Old Man River early in a New Orleans vacation might help younger visitors understand why our city exists where is does and has been rebuilt and reclaimed after wars, fires, and floods.
  8. Therese recommends Mr. B’s Bistro as being kid friendly with great prices for lunch (201 Royal Street, 504-523-2078). Others recommend Arnaud’s Remoulade Restaurant as having authentic New Orleans cuisine at great prices and being kid friendly (309 Bourbon Street, 504-523-0377). I’d recommend the boudin appetizers.
  9. Do a walking tour, or a stroller pushing tour as the case might be. Some of the best walking tours of the French Quarter are done by the National Park rangers. They have pdf files to download with maps and mp3 files with tour information. The HNOC (Historic New Orleans Collection) has a pamphlet of self-guided tours; plus some pretty cool exhibits.
  10. Young and old alike would love a visit to Mardi Gras World (1380 Port of New Orleans Place,  1-800-362-8213).
  11. Finally, be sure to take your kids to Preservation Hall to hear some authentic New Orleans music. Check out the early show at 8 PM (726 St Peter Street, 504-522-2841).

Here’s a cartoon to get you and your children fired up: