Archaeology Weekly Roundup! 2-21-14

Posted in: Archaeology and Media, Archaeology in the News
Tags: Archaeology, ASOR, Aydin, British, bronze age, Christianity, Culture of War, Dibon, iraq, Jordan Valley, linguistics, Middle East, Montana, Roman gold, Roundup, Silver, Trailleis, Ziggurat of Ur
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If you missed anything from the ASOR Facebook or Twitter pages this week, don’t worry. We’ve rounded up some of this week’s archaeology news into one convenient post. If we missed any major archaeological stories from this week, feel free to let us know in the comment section!

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  • A linguistics professor claims he’s decoded 10 words from the Voynich manuscript. 
  • Emma Cunliffe touches on how tangled looting and conflict is in this article, “The Culture of War: Saving History.”
  • British archaeologists return to Iraq to continue excavating the Ziggurat of Ur.
  • Silver discovered while excavating the city of Abel Beth Maacah in northern Israel. 
  • Restoration project is underway for the ancient Aydin city Trailleis after suffering through heavy seismic activity for ages.
  • Amateur treasure hunter finds Roman gold hoard
  • Archaeologists and chemists trace ancient British diets.
  • $1k reward being offered for information on the recent looting of an American Indian archaeological site in Montana.
  • Check out this interactive timeline of the Dibon Excavation Collection in the ASOR Archives!
    A Nabataean temple was discovered at the Dibon site in 1952. Here, workers remove part of a wall.

    A Nabataean temple was discovered at the Dibon site in 1952. Here, workers remove part of a wall.

  • ‘Graffiti’ in Mingary Castle thought to be 700 years old
  • Gruesome Beginnings Of Medical Science’s Anatomical Modeling To Be Outlined At Cambridge U. Talk
  • New evidence unearthed in the Jordan Valley causing debates among archaeologists.
  • Israel Antiquities Authority recently completed excavations of a 2,300-year-old village near pathway to Jerusalem.
  • Scientists believe by pinpointing where Stonehendge stones came from, they can determine how they were transported.
  • Manar Al-Athar (Guide to Archaeology) - Free multi-media resource for the study of the Middle East!
  • A 600-year-old basilica with traces of early Christianity architecture discovered in İznik Lake.
  • Researchers hope to finally solve mystery of why the American Civil War submarine, “The Hunley,” sank.
  • Bronze Age woman unearthed by construction workers.
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